Arturo Pardavila III / Wikimedia Commons

The View From Pluto: Feeling the Baseball Blues

Normally this time of year, Progressive Field is filled with cheering Cleveland Indians fans and fireworks. Now because of the pandemic, Major League Baseball players and owners are locked in contentious negotiations to start the season around July 4 without fans. WKSU sports commentator Terry Pluto says the baseball blues are setting in.

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Commentary: Trump's Lies About Mail-in Voting May Have A Hidden Purpose

The only fraud being perpetrated in the 2020 presidential election so far is the unmitigated nonsense being tweeted out on a nearly daily basis by the president of the United States.

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The only fraud being perpetrated in the 2020 presidential election so far is the unmitigated nonsense being tweeted out on a nearly daily basis by the president of the United States.

Rubber Bowl beside Derby Downs
TIM RUDELL / WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Wednesday, May 27:

Arturo Pardavila III / Wikimedia Commons

Normally this time of year, Progressive Field is filled with cheering Cleveland Indians fans and fireworks. Now because of the pandemic, Major League Baseball players and owners are locked in contentious negotiations to start the season around July 4 without fans. WKSU sports commentator Terry Pluto says the baseball blues are setting in.

Sanitizing large public spaces in the age of the coronavirus is coming down to drones. It may be a way to get fans in the stands sooner. It also could be an effective way to transport a vaccine to the masses once one becomes available. These and other applications have researchers scrambling to find pandemic-era drone applications.

Northeast Ohio’s community health centers are preparing to ramp up coronavirus testing efforts, with a focus on minority and high-risk populations.

The City of Cleveland expected to increasingly enforce restrictions on businesses as the state further reopens following the coronavirus lockdown, Mayor Frank Jackson said in a Friday press conference.

Residents can file a complaint with the city if they suspect a business is violating social distancing or other restrictions. The city will reach out to the business by phone, Jackson said, as well as send a letter notifying the business of the complaint.

Now, a copy of the complaint will also be sent to the Ohio Department of Health, Jackson said.

COVID-19 Led To Shut Down Of Some Addiction Services

15 hours ago

The isolation and stress brought on by COVID-19 have been particularly difficult for people fighting drug addiction.

When Ohio shut down in March to slow the spread of the coronavirus, nonprofits that offer services to people with substance use issues had to change the way they operate to keep the virus at bay.

MetroHealth, which operates an opioid safety office, also had to limit some services said Kelly Cioletti.

“With COVID 19 happening the way it did ... access to treatment, detox, all of that shut down,” Cioletti said.

Help covering rent and mortgage payments is coming to small businesses in Mentor under a new grant program designed to help reopen the local economy.

The Mentor Small Business Restart Program is focusing on small, local storefronts that had no opportunity to collect revenue during the shutdown, said Mentor’s Director of Economic Development and International Trade Kevin Malecek.

COVID-19 closed down the March primary election, and lawmakers extended the absentee ballot deadline to late April.  Voter rights groups are asking state lawmakers to reform voting laws now, to avoid confusion before the November election. But they are not necessarily on the same page when it comes to which reforms should be made. 

1.2 million Ohioans have filed jobless claims since mid-March. And as Ohio’s businesses reopen, workers are concerned about the availability of child care, the cleanliness of their workplaces and the safety of vulnerable family members as they go back to work. And the agency processing claims has seen that concern too.

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From NPR

Tensions between President Trump and Twitter escalated Wednesday as he threatened to "strongly regulate" or shut down social media platforms, which he accused of silencing conservative viewpoints.

Trump's threat came the day after Twitter added a fact-check warning to his tweets claiming that mail-in ballots are fraudulent.

Avery Hoppa's job is practically pandemic-proof: She's a nurse who does triage over the phone. So her work is still necessary, and the transition to working from her home in Hanover, N.H., was smooth. Her husband, a biologist at Dartmouth College, had a slightly bigger adjustment to make when classes went virtual.

They're both still employed, and Hoppa says she feels "so incredibly grateful" about that during this massive economic crisis. Her family has been able to do things like buy a new car and get a good deal on it.

Casinos in Las Vegas and other Nevada cities can reopen next Thursday for the first time since the coronavirus forced the gaming industry to shut down more than two months ago, Gov. Steve Sisolak says. The state plans to revive its gaming industry nearly a week after it starts Phase 2 of its reopening this Friday.

Top of The World — our morning news round up written by editors at The World. Subscribe here.

With COVID-19 deaths spiking in many Latin American countries, Colombia — which has confirmed more than 23,000 cases and 776 deaths — is extending its nationwide lockdown until the end of this month. That has meant more hardship for people living hand to mouth.

So some desperate Colombians have been sending out an eye-catching SOS — with encouragement from local politicians.

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